triple j

abc
Tags: #<Tag:0x00007ff5e95284d8>

#81

What a ludicrous change.
The Hottest 100 is inextricably linked to Australia Day. Changing it just seems moronic, regardless of the reasoning.


#82

It seems a bit pointless to move it by only a few days.

In some years, Australia Day will be the 4th Saturday of January anyway.

If they were going to move it, it should have been to a completely different time of the year.


#83

Basically it means they get to take advantage of the long weekend still most years.

This was always going to happen though - the regular listeners of Triple J have a strong left wing skew and will support the move.

It will however kill the countdown’s popularity. The Hottest 100’s recent popularly it due to appealing to a wider audience who don’t listen any other day of the year - it will be harder to keep that audience without a the public holiday to make a convenient excuse for a party.


#84

I suppose the only advantage is that being a Saturday, more people will be able to celebrate it without having to worry about going to work the next day.


#85

Agreed that moving it will cause it to lose its relevance. But if they felt they had to move it, it should go out on New Year’s Eve IMO.


#86

I agree that New Years Eve would’ve been the ideal alternative date to host the Hottest 100. Although Triple J’s regular listeners will support the move away from January 26, it’s possible that the countdown might lose even further relevance amongst a mainstream audience than it already has through things like the Taylor Swift debacle a couple of years ago.

Personally, I don’t have a particularly strong opinion about the Hottest 100 date change either way although maybe that’s because I very rarely listen to Triple J.


#87

I really doubt this will have very much impact. I feel like anchoring it on a weekend is the sensible decision, and because it is roughly the same time of year as Australia Day, without actually being on Australia Day, it isn’t too big of a deal and keeps both sides moderately pleased.

I feel like moving the countdown away from late January to NYE would be a huge mistake so I’m glad this is what they’ve gone with.


#88

The Federal Communications Minister has described Triple J’s decision on moving the Hottest 100 away from Australia Day as “dumb”.


#89

The citizenship saga, same-sex marriage, backbenchers about to pass a banking royal commission, Michaela Cash having potentially tipped off the media of an AFP raid, 25 Newspolls in a row lost, the Queensland election’s ramifications for the federal parliament, Christopher Pyne’s account having been “hacked”…

…in terms of pressing issues for the government to tackle, the fucking Hottest 100 should be right at the bottom. Even Fifield’s portfolio - Communications - is beset by a rolling scandal about the shittiness of the NBN. I don’t think they’re in a very good position to be drawing even more battlelines, let alone with the public broadcaster…

It’s stupefying how poorly this government conducts itself.


#90

Especially given the whole thing was put to a public vote and the majority wanted a change…

How? It’s only been regularly held on Australia Day since '04.


#91

Indeed, but the idiots who scream PC POLICE!!! will talk about it, despite never listening to it anyway.


#92

13 years is plenty of time to develop a tradition.


#93

Feels more like Triple J aren’t taking a stance on the issue but rather distancing themselves from the debate.

From Triple J website http://www.abc.net.au/triplej/news/musicnews/triple-j-hottest-100-is-moving-to-a-new-date-and-heres-why/9197254

We all agreed that the Hottest 100 shouldn’t be part of a debate about the day it’s on. The only debate should be about the songs

I personally don’t think the date of Australia day needs to change but seems fair enough to me what the ABC have done. No complaints from me.


#94

Certainly plenty of longer traditions that have been broken…

The ‘tradition’ argument doesn’t really stand up in a modern society.


#95

Ok, maybe tradition is the wrong word.

I still think the countdown could have been used as a way to foster and represent change among those cultures.


#96

It has. The song “January 26”, by an Aboriginal artist, was played on the countdown despite being deeply critical of the sort of events the Hottest 100 is often played at. There have also been fundraising forevent aboriginal charities on the last two years of the Hottest 100.

But both of those gestures are deeply undermined if the Hottest 100 is becomes a celebration of a day which Australia’s first people consider an invasion.


#97

Keep dreaming. White Australia will never grasp the hurt that is felt by the traditional owners, their disrespect over this date is a huge indicator.

How would mainstream Australia feel if Indigenous people held a massive celebration on Anzac Day, not positive I wouldn’t think.


#98

People already hold celebrations on ANZAC day though, from respectful ones in the morning to party type celebrations at night. Doesn’t seem to offend anyone.


#99

I’d hope people commemorate, rather than celebrate ANZAC day.


#100

This is getting a bit off-topic, but I’d suggest they’d feel about as positive or negative as their favourite talk-back host, television news bulletin, or newspaper told them to be. Look at the confected outrage over one political tweet one ANZAC Day vs not a peep over wet t-shirt and drinking contests…

‘Mainstream Australia’ goes along with how they’re dictated. If the government and the media all came out in support of a date change, very few people would cause a ruckus. But of course salaciousness and outrage sells, so it’s better to wedge people. You can rally people around controversy in a way that you just can’t with complicity.

It’s like when you’re a kid and when you’re around all your friends you like to show off and be loud and boisterous. When you’re pulled away and told off by an adult, you’re very apologetic because the loud, boisterous actions aren’t really the way you behave, you just like the attention and adoration and sense of belonging that having the group accept you brings to you. The same is true across populations. We like to think we’ve grown up, but we’re still being loud and boisterous not because we necessarily feel that way, but because it feels good to belong to something.