Media Watch

abc
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#1

Media Watch

Returns Monday 1 February at 9.20pm

Australia’s leading forum for media analysis and comment, presented by one of Australia’s most respected journalists Paul Barry

Archived topic Media Watch


#2

Based on the following programming Media Watch must finish up for the year before 28 November.

http://forums.mediaspy.org/t/abc-main-channel-programs-and-schedules/105/186?u=tv.cynic


#3

Final Medi Watch for 2016 is Monday 21 November


#4

Updated graphics and all in HD now.


#5

A statement by the Press Council Executive Director:

Media Watch: "Paparazzi, privacy and the Press Council”, aired on 27 March 2017

A segment in the Media Watch program on 27 March 2017 entitled “Paparazzi, privacy and the Press Council”, focusing on the Press Council’s Osher Günsberg/Daily Mail adjudication, contained a significant factual error and omitted some important background material.

The segment stated that “the Daily Mail’s only punishment was a requirement to post this link on the story”. In fact, on the date of publication of an Adjudication involving an online-only publisher, the Press Council requires the publication concerned to publish the Council’s summary at a prominent place on its home page for 24 hours with a link to the full Adjudication, and the Adjudication is also permanently published on the publication’s website. The publication is also required to attach permanently the archive note which links to the Adjudication.

The Press Council also issues a media release about the Adjudication, publishes it in full on our website, and posts it on Twitter. All of these steps are an important part of the public expression of the Press Council’s consideration of the complaint, and are very important from the complainant’s point of view. All these steps were followed in this case.

Importantly, the program omitted all reference to Mr Günsberg’s public statements that he was very happy with the result of the Press Council’s process and had no complaint about the Daily Mail’s “punishment” being lacking. Links to these statements are available at http://www.pedestrian.tv/news/entertainment/osher-on-the-mail-shaming-his-bod-everyone-has-a-r/b44a0ce0-4e22-4445-84db-ae9e10cd6659.htm and https://www.imediaethics.org/au-bachelor-host-complains-fat-shaming-bali-belly-story-press-council-rules/

The program also offered no acknowledgement of the benefits of the broad publication of an Adjudication, and specifically in attaching it to the article complained about, in promoting responsible journalism. The way the Council publicly calls out poor practice of an individual publication has a powerful educational effect on all publishers, editors and journalists, who are placed on notice about what is expected of them. The vigorous manner in which publishers defend their actions during the Council’s process strongly suggests that they take this seriously, and do not wish to be seen by their peers or by the public as falling short of the acceptable standards of practice in the media industry.

Prior to airing of this segment, the Press Council provided Media Watch with details about the process for publication of Adjudications and alerted it to Mr Günsberg’s public statements, which of course were publicly available. After the program, the Press Council requested that Media Watch correct these matters, but while Media Watch has since included a note on its website about the Daily Mail’s publication of the Adjudication, it has declined to take any other remedial steps.

I believe it is appropriate to issue this Statement because the incorrect impressions created by the program have not been adequately remedied by Media Watch itself, and could lead the public into a mistaken understanding of what occurs during and after the Press Council’s complaints-handling process. It is of the utmost concern that this segment could potentially deter bona fide complainants from availing themselves of the Press Council’s complaint-handling process.


Australian Press Council
#6

The Media Watch producers must enjoy reading Mediaspy. Tonight’s show included a reference to Bruce Gordon’s ownership of the Crawford’s back catalogue airing on 10 if things go wrong. All your doomsday fantasies come true, those in that camp must be so excited that the ABC has validated their rumour mongering.


#7

Nice idea but I don’t recall them ever mentioning the horror which is about to be inflicted on Northern NSW, and if Gordon gets control of Ten, perhaps the rest of the country…mappy. :fearful:


#8

I was expecting a lot more of a retrospective of the year tonight with mention of the big media reform legislation and possibly Ten’s administration. All we got were a 4 or 5 funny clips. Yet we again got a story with Allan Jones and Andrew Bolt.


#9

But it was a positive Bolt story (sort of)! And anyway, Milo and Jones have a lot in common I’d imagine.


#10

Returns Monday 5 February


#11

New full screen graphics this year:


#12

Someone’s having a sook:
https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/blogs/tim-blair/nobodys-watching-nobody-cares/news-story/0fb632369b6165647fbd0771b4f248b5?nk=53029f0065a4bc20a7736768f84b0a11-1518056118


#13

While Media Watch isn’t perfect, I have considerably more respect for that program than almost anything from Tim Blair or The Daily Telegraph.


#14

I’ve noticed that they’ve been using an echo effect on the voiceovers on Media Watch more and more these days.

It seems to be used for almost everything being read out now, whereas previously it’d only be used when the tone of the quote/snipping required it (sensationalist headline, ranting, etc.)

It’s very annoying, I wish they’d tone it down a bit or cut it out completely.


#15

A great article/interview from TV Tonight with Media Watch host Paul Barry:


#16

Wonderful read, seemingly good rapport between Paul and David.

Thanks for letting us know @SydneyCityTV otherwise I wouldn’t have read it.


#17

I ripped these episodes of Media Watch from a special website for the 20th anniversary show from 2009 and uploaded them to Youtube.

The very first episode from 1989:

The 100th episode from 1992:

The Paxtons:

Barcelona Tonight:

An ep from the Richard Ackland era from 1998, featuring a short-lived intro and theme which only existed in 1998:

The first airing of John Safran’s confrontation with Ray Martin outside his house:

Cash for comment:

The first episode from Paul Barry’s first stint in the chair in 2000:

…and the interview which got him sacked and the show cancelled for 2001:

An extended interview with Stuart Littlemore. It was specified in the XML file on that web page, but doesn’t actually appear on the website (so it was hidden for some reason). This is probably the first time this full interview has been seen:


#18

Those breathlessly awaiting SCA’s change of SC News in Tas to 7 News have had the issue well covered by MW tonight.

MW’s investigation brought on the media release.


#19

The 2000 set looks lovely. It’s a shame it is so dull these days.


#20

lol, it’s just a cheapo Officeworks printed backdrop now. Just goes to show how the ABC has coped with its funding difficulties over the past 20 years.