Overseas TV History

Another clip of the American Forces Network, this time a 1981 newscast from AFN Berlin:

Here are some pages from the AFN TV Guide:

AFN was also listed in German TV magazines:

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Could be, but we have a better idea of where the inspiration for Seven’s 1989-1999 logo came from:

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Headlines recap and closer of an edition of Subrayado (Canal 10 Montevideo’s news service) on 30 July 1996, presented by Jorge Traverso and Blanca Rodriguez. Traverso retired from the program on 24 February 2013 after 23 years at the desk, while Rodriguez has been anchoring solo since then.

Recently, on 16 May 2022, the program was revamped, with a new studio and graphics. The music heard at the 2:27 minute mark (composed by Carlos Cotelo) has been in use for over 20 years.

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Is Canal 10 a CBS-owned station?

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Canal 10 has been locally owned (by a company called Grupo Fontaina-De Feo) since it signed on in December 1956. For most of its history, the station has used variations of the famous CBS eye as its logo.

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A historical compilation of news intros used by the fast-paced, tabloid-flavored, hyper-local CityTV in Toronto since the 1970s:

Speaking of Canada, here’s an interesting overview of what makes Canadian TV unusual, at least compared to the U.S. (and Australian) TV systems:

A summary:

1) Canadian networks re-mix the U.S. schedule.
2) Canada’s public broadcaster looks more like a commercial network.
3) All Canadian cable and satellite providers carry affiliates of every U.S. broadcast network.
4) Canadian stations also have to compete with stations from other Canadian markets.
5) Not one Canadian network has true national coverage.

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Moving across the Atlantic to the UK, here’s an interesting new YouTube mini-doc from Adam Martyn about the ITV strike of 1968 and the emergency service that was broadcast during the work stoppage:

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A public information message from Canal 13 Buenos Aires in 1985, where the station admits that it’s making several decisions to save money and, at the same time, provide high-quality shows to its audience (e.g. eliminating 90 hours of programming a month).

13 was a well respected, state-owned commercial station and was facing huge losses (like most public companies in Argentina), being constantly affected by the country’s volatile economy. In 1989, the Menem administration wanted to shut down channels 11 and 13 due to their critical situation, but this idea was considered unpopular and privatization was chosen as the way to save them (which happened at the end of that year). Since then, it’s been owned by Grupo Clarin, one of the largest media conglomerates in the country. Between 1960 and 1974, 13 was a private channel (owned by Cuban businessman Goar Mestre) and enjoyed a long tenure of quality and success: its programs were usually rated #1.

In Portugal, RTP1 viewers were getting their late news extremely late at night in April 2002, as seen in this bulletin presented by Vasco Matos Trigo, which aired at 2.15am (and it’s not a replay)! 24 Horas was usually screened in a different timeslot every night: it was removed from the schedule the following year. The name was revived by corporate siblings RTPN/RTP Informação/RTP3 during the next 2 decades.

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Bruce Gyngell was not just the first person to appear on (regularly scheduled) Australian television; he later also served as the managing director of the UK’s TV-am, a company that provided morning television for the ITV network. Here’s a interesting documentary about the troubled history of TV-am, including the decisive role Gyngell played during its relatively brief existence:

A must-watch for anyone interested in British TV history!

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From Los Angeles, a 1993 open and close of the KTLA Morning News, one of the first local morning newscasts to successfully go head-to-head with the network morning shows:

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The program took advantage from the fact that rival TV stations in the area affiliated with the big 3 networks (KCBS, KNBC and KABC) were airing their morning shows on a 3-hour tape-delay, so KTLA could provide live coverage of local news stories, weather, traffic, entertainment and a good dose of banter. Despite several anchor changes over the years, the format remains almost intact.

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Indeed. The second of these pre-launch promos from 1991 makes precisely this point:

An here’s a look back at the early years from their sixth anniversary show:

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Let’s travel to the Caribbean–and 55 years back in time:

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An interesting look at Breakfast Time, America’s forgotten morning show from the 1990s:

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The program moved to Fox on 12 August 1996, airing under the new name of After Breakfast, but only lasted 1 season on the air. Here’s the full first episode:

Was it unable to compete against shows like Regis & Kathie Lee and the tabloid talk shows?

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And from 1992, here’s the first-ever edition of show that inspired it, The Big Breakfast from Channel 4 in the UK:

Its predecessor was the very different Channel 4 Daily, a hard news program with segments devoted to news, business, traffic, etc., interspersed with short game shows and other entertainment features:

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