Classification

Happy to be corrected, but I believe the difference between R and AV, was something along the lines of the violence content of an R rated film was ok, if the TV version is classified as AV.
The sexy content of an R film though, couldn’t go through unedited, and had to edited back to an MA

I thought E was for Exempt for classification (i think it was for sports coverage?). Unless the E branding has been dropped, and stuff like sport is a G classification.

I vaguely remember reading E for sports. I hope someone has more info.

Different codes of practice for the ABC and SBS, compared to the commercial channels. So SBS called it “MAV” instead of “AV”, and ABC didn’t use the rating at all (except that their code had said all MA programs had to be after 9.30 anyway, so there was little point).

Otherwise @Sully has it right as to what it used to mean. AV/MAV doesn’t exist anymore (at all), it was eliminated in the most recent codes of practice for both commercial channels and SBS. Nowadays MA rated content can start at 8.30, except for films on the commercial channels which still have to start at 9.

Obviously R18+ doesn’t exist for free-to-air TV, although it’s still relevant for certain channels (probably including the movie ones, not just the “obvious” ones) on Foxtel.

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E is still there, but doesn’t appear on air like how G doesn’t appear on the ABC.

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Exempt isn’t a rating per se (for obvious reasons). It definitely gets used on DVD/Blu-ray discs and the like (and sometimes on on-demand sites I imagine), arguably because to do otherwise would make it look like it was missing a rating completely (which might cause issues with regulation).

It ended up semi-standardised in the “multi-coloured” classification graphics with a grey background, but I think that is an industry thing and not officially regulated, unlike say the “CTC” [Check The Classification] pre-rating label.

Never seen an exempt rating actually appear on TV though.

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Aaaah, now i know where i have seen the E (exempt) coding… on the covers of some DVDs. Thank you for mentioning that. Yes, its there on DVD’s and not on the telly. It’s all cleared up on my end now. Thank you.

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“E” (Exempt from Classification), used for news/current affairs/sport/docos, including investigations often seen on Seven and Nine but that aren’t produced by Seven News or seen as news per se.

It is absolutely still used by the networks, not sure if all do however, as it’s not official in ACMA’s Code. See it all the time on EPG. Sometimes an EPG might instead have “–” (double hyphen) to denote the same.

Feature films actually can also commence at 8:30pm in the current Code.

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you’re saying that this “E” classification is used on-air? I’ve literally never seen it. News programs that are exempt from classification just don’t carry any classification at all.

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Not on air, but I definitely see it used in the EPGs, guides, etc

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I’ll be on the lookout for it now because I have never seen it ever.

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I figured we were talking showing a graphic “on-air/on-screen” more than in EPGs, but I agree that there would need to be filler in data feeds for classification-exempt content.

Whether that’s a blank, an “E” (which I may have seen in now-and-next info on TV but I’ve barely looked at that lately so don’t quote me), or something else (eg. Nine’s ex-YourTV guide uses “NC” for “not classified”), arguably doesn’t matter all too much I guess, if the understanding is there that it’s exempt under the codes of practice.

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I only came across this today when I was checking a program guide update:

https://www.abc.net.au/tv/guide/abc1-7day-guide.htm

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Isn’t the E classification usually reserved for DVDs?

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