60 Minutes

Check it out on 9Now.

Any differences with the new look? Unfortunately I’m not in Australia at the moment.

Basically, it’s pretty much the same colour scheme as seen in the promos. White with hints of red is the main colour scheme, a departure from the dark red/black look that 60 Minutes has traditionally taken. Not to mention the modified logo and everything else.

And yes, the “presenter rollcall” intro was used last night in the new style as well.

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A few screen grabs

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Thanks @SydneyCityTV and @TV.Cynic :smiley:

###60 Minutes

Sunday 14 February at 8.15pm

TAKEN
Chances are you will find this story incredibly hard to believe. It’s confronting and confounding, but it really happened. Raised in middle-class Sydney, Katie Lang’s future was almost assured – exciting and prosperous. But her big mistake was to fall in love with the wrong man. Katie thought Damion Baston wanted to be her boyfriend. What he really wanted was to be her pimp. He used violence to control her, turning her into a sex slave and trafficking her around the world. But what this monster didn’t anticipate was Katie’s strength, and when she was finally able to escape his abuse, she set about plotting her revenge.
Reporter: Tara Brown
Producer: Laura Sparkes

CYNDI LAUPER
If you didn’t know better you’d swear the word quirky was invented to describe singer Cyndi Lauper. Everything about her is unique, from her highly distinctive voice to her individual fashion sense. But thank goodness for Cyndi Lauper. Her catchy hits – some of them silly, all of them heartfelt – helped us get through the 1980s. The songs continue to get airplay around the world, but today Cyndi’s enjoying a career renaissance with her Broadway musical, Kinky Boots. She is also raising her considerable voice for those without a voice, the alienated and the less well-off, and she wants Australian politicians to start listening.
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producer: Phil Goyen

Note- no previews provided yet

###60 Minutes

Sunday 21 February at 8.15pm

TRAPPED
This tale almost defies belief. When Australian Amaal Finn took her daughter to Egypt on a family trip, she could never have imagined the terrible chain of events that would unfold. Once there, Amaal’s husband convinced her to sign documents written in Arabic. She did as she was asked, but what she was signing was a form, banning mother and child from leaving Egypt. This single act of betrayal has sentenced Amaal and her six-year-old daughter Zareen to a life removed from everyone and everything they have ever known. For nearly three years they have battled bureaucracy and the courts to see this travel ban overturned. Meanwhile her former husband, Mazen Baouimy, has returned to a comfortable life in Australia where he defiantly refuses to assist Amaal and his daughter in any way.
Reporter: Michael Usher
Producer: Steven Burling

HOME GROANS
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Here’s the good news: for the past 30 years we’ve all enjoyed watching the value of our homes skyrocket. Now the bad: the housing boom is about to end, and for many Australians – both homeowners and investors – it’s going to end in tears. While you think you’ve heard this all before, remember we now have the highest household debt in the world. Worse still, we have become so blasé about the way we borrow money, we’ve forgotten the consequences – most importantly, that we need to pay it back. So if you have a home loan and you want to stand any chance of surviving a wipeout, you need to be very, very careful.
Reporter: Ross Coulthart
Producer: Grace Tobin

SKY HIGH
There are 20 billion reasons why the federal government had to get the decision right in selecting the F35 as the next fighter for the Royal Australian Air Force. It is by far our biggest defence purchase ever, but with 72 F35s on the way we are apparently getting a great bang for our buck. The sales pitch boasts that the combat jet is a flying supercomputer loaded with so much weaponry and “gee whiz” stealth technology that no enemy can see it and won’t stand a chance against it. C Critics complain the F35s are badly designed and are an expensive waste of money. The only Australians who know for sure are two RAAF test pilots posted to the Arizona desert to train on the new aircraft. Tara Brown accepted their invitation to take a close-up look at their deadly new toys.
Reporter: Tara Brown
Producer: Howard Sacre

Back to 7pm where it should be, from next Sunday due to ratings.

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60 Minutes

Sunday 28 February at 7.00 pm

WHERE IS BABY TEGAN?
Watch the sneak peek
It’s a simple question with a diabolically difficult answer. Is Tegan Lane dead or alive? She was last seen as a two-day-old being carried out of a Sydney hospital by her mother Keli, an aspiring Australian Olympian. That was 20 years ago, but the mystery of what happened to baby Tegan after that has never been explained. Instead there has been any number of theories and wild accusations, mostly to do with the bizarre behaviour of her mother, Keli Lane – sordid stories about sexual affairs and secret pregnancies. In 2010, Keli was found guilty of murdering Tegan, even though her body has never been found. Now, in a last desperate bid to prove she is not a baby killer, Keli’s parents, Sandra and Robert, break their silence.
Reporter: Allison Langdon
Producer: Rebecca Le Tourneau

MORE OR LESS
Food glorious food – we obviously need it to live, but what’s staggering is just how many of us it is killing. Enormous appetites have made us the third fattest developed country on earth, and one million Australians are now so obese their only real hope of a normal life is increasingly radical weight loss surgery. If it goes well there can be extraordinary transformations, which prove less really is more. But should we be operating on young children? And how young is too young for these drastic operations? Tara Brown first met 14-year-old Ashlee Young two years ago as she made the difficult decision about whether to go under the knife. Ashlee today will amaze you.
Reporter: Tara Brown
Producers: Gareth Harvey and Steve Jackson

OFF THE EDGE
Watch the sneak peek
This is a story that was almost over before it began. Just days before Liz Hayes was to film with real-life skiing Superman JT Holmes, he was trapped in an avalanche and buried alive for six minutes. As with everything JT does, this ordeal was captured on camera. JT tells Hayes he’s unfazed by his brush with death and he puts it down to one of the risks of being an extreme sportsman. JT Holmes hurtles down mountains on skis, jumps off cliffs and flies through the air. He’s leading a new generation of sport stars who need to test – and show off – the risky limits of their athletic skills.
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producer: Phil Goyen

60 Minutes

Sunday 6 March at 7.00 pm

PREACHER OF HATE
We now have a frighteningly clear picture of the next terrorist who will attack Australia on home soil. Chances are he’ll be a lone wolf, a young radicalised Muslim man armed with whatever is at hand: a knife, a gun, a car. As we have seen already on the streets of Melbourne and Sydney, his victims will be selected at random. But it’s unlikely this young jihadist will be acting alone. Lurking in the background will be one of a new breed of online recruiters, charismatic and ready to exploit pent-up grievances and anger. This week, for the first time, you will meet one of these hate preachers. His name is Abu Haleema, and he lives not in Syria or Iraq, but in the safety and comfort of London. In this exclusive 60 Minutes investigation, we reveal for the first time the big following Abu Haleema already has in Australia, and just how he is spreading his online message of hate and terror to our kids.
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producer: Stephen Rice

SAVING BABY WILLOW
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Baby Willow is three months old. She’s beautiful and perfect, and thankfully for her, blissfully unaware of the angst she has caused her parents, Sam and John Callahan. When Sam was pregnant a routine scan revealed a deadly tumour on Willow’s lung. The outlook for the unborn baby was bleak until a very clever and courageous Melbourne surgeon decided to defy the odds and attempt a high risk in-utero procedure never before performed in Australia. It was delicate and dangerous surgery – and just the beginning of an incredible battle by an extraordinary group of medicos to save Willow, all captured by 60 Minutes cameras.
Reporter: Tara Brown
Producers: Rebecca Le Tourneau, Alice Dalley

MUMMY DEAREST
In the ultra-competitive world of digging up the past, the significance of new archaeological discoveries is often measured against the greatest of them all - King Tutankhamun. Ever since the discovery of Tut and all those golden riches in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings almost a hundred years ago, we’ve been hoping for something to rival, or even beat it. Now, we just might have found it. Using space age technology - lasers, 3D scanning and thermal imaging - a group of researchers thinks they’ve found where the famed Queen Nefertiti lies. And as Michael Usher discovers, her tomb may be much closer than anyone ever imagined.
Reporter: Michael Usher
Producer: Steven Burling

http://www.couriermail.com.au/entertainment/television/masked-men-attack-60-minutes-crew-in-sweden/news-story/acdf5f61158f5a647bf35ef4283beaa8

60 Minutes

Sunday 13 March at 7.00 pm

LIVING THE DREAM
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When Jarryd Hayne announced he was quitting rugby league to chase a long-held ambition to play American football, people thought the “Hayne Plane” was plain crazy. Why would this NRL superstar give up the fortune and the fame he earned in Australia to follow a dream all the experts said couldn’t be realised? Hayne himself had doubts. He didn’t know if he’d be good enough for American football, he didn’t even know the complicated rules of the game. All he knew was that he wanted to give it a go. So he did. This Sunday on 60 Minutes, an extraordinary behind-the-scenes look at Hayne’s incredible journey – from saying goodbye to his family and former team mates to landing in LA with nowhere to live; the search for an NFL team willing to give him a go; and the highs and lows of competing in the world’s toughest sport. It is raw, unprecedented access to a young man brave enough to live his dream, and a reminder to everyone that the impossible can be possible.
Reporter: Karl Stefanovic
Producer: Laura Sparkes

NOT WELCOME HOME
Australia’s spy agency, ASIO, has declared 19-year-old Oliver Bridgeman from Toowoomba an enemy of the nation. It suspects him of being a terrorist. Bridgeman says the accusation is not true, and that far from being a risk, he is a humanitarian aid worker. His problem, though, is that for the past year he’s been living in Syria, a country destroyed by civil war and overrun by Islamic State extremists. Now Bridgeman wants to come home, but our government refuses to lay out the welcome mat. On 60 Minutes, his distraught parents break their silence and tell Tara Brown of their anguish at the betrayal of authorities who up until now had promised to help them bring their son home.
Reporter: Tara Brown
Producers: Gareth Harvey, Ali Smith

TRUMP
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It was once hard to believe but is now looking more and more likely that Donald Trump, the billionaire property developer and loudmouth reality TV star, could become America’s next President. And if it happens, brace yourself for a bumpy ride. Many in the conservative Republican Party in the United States are embarrassed by Trump’s antics, but his bellicose mix of bluster and outrage has won over a majority of white, middle-America. “The Donald” is not afraid to say exactly what he thinks, and as Michael Usher finds out on the Trump campaign trail, the world had better start listening.
Reporter: Michael Usher
Producer: Phil Goyen

60 Minutes

Sunday 20 March at 7.00 pm

PURE EVIL
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It was an act of pure evil which frightened, then outraged, a nation. A vicious gang of Melbourne criminals detonated an enormous car bomb outside Melbourne’s Russell Street Police complex. A young policewoman was killed and more than 20 other people were injured. The bombers’ motive for the crime was a hatred of authority and a desire to kill as many police as possible. Now 30 years later, Ross Coulthart reveals how only sheer luck prevented the death toll from being much higher. With assistance from Australia’s most experienced explosives expert, 60 Minutes recreates the Russell Street blast with the force the bombers intended. Coulthart also interviews one of the original gang members who turned supergrass, as well as detectives involved in the case. They now link the Russell Street bombers to another terrible crime – the 1992 abduction and murder of a teenage girl.
Reporter: Ross Coulthart
Producer: Garry McNab

BREAKING POINT
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When Liz Hayes set out to report a story about the largest movement of people since World War Two – the millions of refugees fleeing Middle Eastern trouble spots for the safety of Western Europe – she had no idea she and her 60 Minutes crew would become the story. While filming in Sweden they were attacked on the streets of Stockholm; punched, kicked, and the cameraman was run over. Fortunately the team escaped without serious injury. Hayes’ story shows how Sweden has become a victim of its own humanity. By welcoming hundreds of thousands of refugees and asylum seekers, the country is now gripped by serious security issues and is at breaking point. Many other European nations are in a similar position and have closed their borders. However it hasn’t stopped the refugees coming – in their desperate millions.
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producer: Stephen Rice

STORY 3 TO BE ADVISED

I remember Channel Seven’s Sunday Night did a story on the Russell Street bombing in 2014 or 2015, so 60 Minutes is looking at the incident from another angle.

60 Minutes

Sunday 27 March at 7.00 pm

MATES
Everyone knows Mick Fanning is so much more than a champion surfer and occasional shark wrestler. He’s one of the most decent human beings on the planet, and his friendship with Barney Miller proves it. As a youngster, Barney dreamt of being a professional surfer until he was severely injured in a car crash when he was twenty. The accident left him a quadriplegic. Tough times followed, but ten years ago he had a chance meeting with Fanning and they’ve been best mates ever since. These days Mick takes Barney surfing and is also literally helping him get back on his feet. But like any good mate, Barney is also helping Mick recover from the personal and professional traumas he has endured in the past 12 months.
Reporter: Peter Stefanovic
Producer: Mary Ann Jolley

TERROR IN BRUSSELS
As the people of Belgium mourn their dead after another senseless terrorist attack, many people are now asking how such hatred could come from within its own borders. On 60 Minutes this week Michael Usher reports from Molenbeek, a Brussels suburb many locals call “terror town”. Molenbeek is widely known as a breeding ground for jihadists. This small but densely populated neighbourhood has been linked to as many as four attacks in Europe, including the carnage in Paris last year. Usher confronts the local mayor to find out why nothing has been done to stop the radicalisation of a generation of young men.
Reporter: Michael Usher
Producers: Phil Goyen, Garry McNab

DIRTY SECRET
While politics and skulduggery are frequent bedfellows in most countries, it’s hard to believe the extent of the intrigue and corruption in the Malaysian government. The greatest scandal surrounds the murder of a beautiful young woman who was having an affair with a high-ranking apparatchik. Only she wasn’t just killed, she was blown to pieces with explosives by two government bodyguards. One of her killers, Sirul Azhar Umar, was sentenced to death but fled to Australia and is now being held in Sydney’s Villawood Detention Centre. It’s believed Sirul is keeping a dirty secret about who ordered the murder. Now, Malaysia’s former Prime Minister, Mahathir Mohamad – himself an outspoken and controversial figure – has come out of retirement to have his say. He tells Ross Coulthart the Australian government needs to protect its Malaysian detainee and grant him immediate asylum.
Reporter: Ross Coulthart
Producers: Grace Tobin, Mary Ann Jolley

WAR CRIMINAL
As European nations and other countries, including Australia, battle Islamic extremism, the endgame in another brutal conflict – the Bosnian war of the 1990s – is being played out in the Netherlands. The War Crimes Tribunal is about to pass judgment on Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, who is accused of genocide. Back in 1993, at the height of the terrible war, the late Richard Carleton filmed a remarkable 60 Minutes interview with Karadzic, which not only highlighted the alleged war criminal’s evil activities but also Carleton’s very brave interviewing style.
Reporters: Richard Carleton, Tara Brown
Producer: Howard Sacre

[quote=“TV.Cynic, post:36, topic:117”]
TERROR IN …Reporter: Michael Usher
[/quote] Musher was actually in Brussels where he did the introduction to the story for 60 Minutes this evening.

60 Minutes

Sunday 3 April at 8:15 pm

EYE CATCHING
That venerable crime-fighting institution, Scotland Yard, is currently recruiting good-lookers. No, it doesn’t need more attractive police officers, but rather people with a talent for never forgetting a face. They are called “super recognisers” and they’re the tiny percentage of humans who have the ability to distinguish and differentiate one person’s face from millions of others, even if they’ve only seen that face once, and even if it was years or decades ago. British police have now formed an elite squad of “super recognisers” and their investigative results are so impressive that Australian police are now taking a closer look. And that means if you’ve got something to hide, you’d better watch out.
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producer: Stephen Rice

GERM WARFARE
At 24, Sam O’Sullivan thought he was invincible. An elite athlete and rising Aussie Rules star, nothing could stop him. Then one day seven months ago he felt slightly ill. At first he thought he had a hangover, then possibly the flu, but he didn’t get better. It turns out an extremely rare flesh-eating superbug had somehow invaded his body and was devouring his muscles. The microbe, called Necrotizing Myositis, was as virulent as it was frightening. Doctors said if Sam was lucky he’d survive, but they’d have to amputate limbs. The more likely outcome, they warned, was death. Sam O’Sullivan’s only hope was to go to war against this killer germ.
Reporter: Tara Brown
Producers: Gareth Harvey, Alice Dalley

SHIP HAPPENS
When it comes to fun and adventure on the high seas, Australians lead the world. Every year more than a million of us are farewelled by family and friends as we head out on a cruise. And because business is so full steam ahead here, shipbuilders in Germany are working overtime to construct even bigger and more opulent ships. As Michael Usher discovered, the ocean liner assembly line is an astonishing sight that’s only matched by the mega-ships that come off it – one of which will soon be calling Australia home.
Reporter: Michael Usher
Producer: Phil Goyen

HIS FINEST HOUR
It often takes tragedy for people to realise their own incredible strength and courage. Four years ago army engineer Curtis McGrath stood on a landmine in Afghanistan. Both his legs were blown off. But Curtis was the medic on this patrol, so even though he was horrifically injured, he had to supervise his own emergency treatment. In his finest hour, he did a fantastic job – he survived. Back home, Curtis has not only learnt to walk again but has now passed an extraordinary physical test to achieve an incredible dream.
Reporter: Michael Usher
Producer: Alice Dalley

https://twitter.com/sophie_walsh9/status/706654637034635265
New addition to the team- former Nine News QLD reporter Sean Power. Possibly a producer?

Fairfax reports Tara Brown and a 60 Minutes camera crew has been detained in Lebanon trying to film the recovery of two Australian children who had been taken to Beirut by their Lebanese father. Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said that Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is seeking to confirm the whereabouts and welfare of the crew and have offered consular assistance.

UPDATE: consular officials have located Tara, the two cameramen, and the mother of the children involved in the incident and visited them in custody.