60 Minutes


#334

Allison Langdon begin the show tonight with developments on the London Attack in front of a plasma screen with a cross to Seb Costello in London.


#335

Wait, didn’t Carrie Bickmore come up with “Beanies for Brain Cancer”?


#336

No. The Mark Hughes Foundation held the first Wear A Beanie For Brain Cancer week in June 2014. Carrie launched her campaign in May 2015. Mark Hughes appeared on The Project at the time to discuss it.


#337

Sunday 11 June at 9.00 pm

UNMASKED
19 year old Dylan Voller spent much of his childhood locked up in juvenile detention centres in the Northern Territory. And there he might have stayed, caught up in the revolving door of the prison system, if it wasn’t for the public exposure of shocking videos depicting his treatment on the inside. The images so outraged the nation, the Prime Minister ordered the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the NT. Despite this Dylan remains a polarising figure. Many people argue he deserved what he received; he was an out of control criminal and the community was safer with him locked up. But as Liz Hayes reports, Dylan doesn’t shy away from the criticisms of his behaviour, and what he has to say will surprise many.
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producer: Ali Smith

GAME ON
Reporter Peter Stefanovic used to think computer gaming was not much more than a bit of fun on a lazy afternoon when there was nothing else to do. But on 60 MINUTES he discovers how wrong he was when he meets Gamers who are so skilled on the keyboard, they actually make a living out of it. In fact, e-Sport, as its known, has become a multi-billion dollar industry. The best players earn seven figure salaries and are treated like celebrities as they tour the world performing in overflowing stadiums you have to see to believe.
Reporter: Peter Stefanovic
Producer: Alice Dalley

TURIA
When Turia Pitt was trapped in a raging bush fire and suffered horrific burns six years ago, she fought an incredible battle just to survive. By coming so close to death she learnt how precious life is and how important it is to live it. Turia’s recovery - often painful and slow - continues even today, but it hasn’t stopped her walking the Kokoda Track, cycling across Australia and competing in multiple iron woman events. She also devotes a significant amount of her time to raising money and awareness for Interplast, the not-for-profit organisation which provides life-changing surgery and medical training in 17 countries across the Asia-Pacific region. A few weeks ago Turia was about to embark on her latest adventure, climbing to Mt Everest base camp in Nepal. But at the last minute she had to pull out of the trek, and turn instead to face her greatest challenge of all.
Reporter: Allison Langdon
Producer: Ali Smith


#338

Sunday 18 June at 9.00 pm

DIANA’S SECRETS
When Diana, the Princess of Wales died in a car crash in a Paris city tunnel 20 years ago the world could barely believe it. She had been one of the most adored women of the 20th century, the young girl who’d grown up and married her prince, the heir to the throne, in a fairytale romance. Sadly, the fairytale was just that, a myth. Despite intense scrutiny and speculation, the reality was a story no one wanted to believe until Diana told journalist and author Andrew Moreton the secrets of her miserable existence; the reasons for her failed marriage and her heartbreaking attempts to end her life. Moreton’s book was a jaw-dropping expose which changed the Palace forever. Now 25 years later Liz Hayes discovers there’s even more to this story – an intriguing spy tale worthy of its own book. There are revelations about secret tape recordings and clandestine meetings which will once again captivate all Royal watchers. And Moreton has even more disclosures about what the Princess told him.
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producers: Eliza Berkery, Jo Townsend

LORDE KNOWS
Just a few short years ago, Lorde was a shy and awkward schoolgirl in New Zealand. Then she wrote and recorded the song Royals, which she gave away free to anyone who wanted it. It was either an act of great generosity or masterful marketing, but probably both. Almost instantly the then 16 year old transformed herself into a pop princess. Her unique voice and extraordinary songwriting ability catapulted her to music stardom. Now, four years later, there’s a second coming. Lorde is back with new music and a highly anticipated – and applauded – new album. And as Allison Langdon discovered, she’s as intelligent, quirky and wonderful as ever.
Reporter: Allison Langdon
Producer: Garry McNab

DEATH OF A CHAMP
If ever there was an example of why the sport of boxing has so many critics demanding it should be banned, then the tragedy of professional boxer Davey Browne is surely it. Two years ago Browne was in a Sydney boxing ring, literally fighting for his life. He lost, dying at just 28 years of age. This week, the New South Wales Coroner will hand down findings into the circumstances which allowed the young champion to be beaten to death in a supposedly properly regulated and fully sanctioned international bout. The question is why didn’t boxing officials step in to stop the fight? It’s something Browne’s family - most of whom watched him die - desperately need answered.
Reporter: Ross Coulthart
Producer: Garry McNab


#339

Sunday 25 June at 9.30 pm

A DAY IN THE LIFE
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the release of the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. It’s the musical masterpiece many consider the greatest rock and roll album ever made. For Paul McCartney that’s not a bad achievement in a career overflowing with accolades and accomplishments. With the Beatles, Wings and as a solo artist, McCartney has sold more than 700 million albums and won so many awards he can barely remember them. His contribution to music has also been recognised with a knighthood. Sir Paul has just celebrated his 75th birthday but has no plans to slow down – instead he’s now got Australia in his sights.
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producer: Eliza Berkery

THE TALKING DEAD
Twelve months ago, crime fighters in Australia got a brand new weapon. It’s a little gruesome so it’s hidden away in a secret location in the Blue Mountains west of Sydney, but already it is helping police solve murders and missing person cases. It’s Australia’s first body farm. That’s right, a final, very exposed resting place for some of those very generous people who agree to donate themselves to science when they die. In America body farms have proven a vital forensic tool, where investigators are able to study rates of human decomposition. As Peter Stefanovic discovers, listening to the talking dead is a confronting, but also intriguing, experience.
Reporter: Peter Stefanovic
Producer: Grace Tobin

THE GREAT DIVIDE
In 1967, Israel defeated its Arab neighbours and rewrote the map of the Middle East in the so-called Six Day War. Since then Palestinians on the West Bank have been forced to live under Israeli occupation and control. What infuriates them even more is Israel’s policy of building Jewish settlements on what they consider to be their land. The result of this ongoing and highly provocative act is more hate, more violence, and more death. Not surprisingly it is also breeding new generations of Israelis and Palestinians for whom the word peace is anathema.
Reporter: Liam Bartlett
Producer: Howard Sacre

DEATH OF A CHAMP
It’s a tough question, but it needs to be asked: Is boxing sport or savagery? Last week Ross Coulthart investigated the senseless death of champion professional fighter Davey Browne, who was literally beaten to death in the boxing ring in 2015. The fight was a fully sanctioned international bout, but even though Browne was in distress, none of the supervising officials stepped in to stop it. On Thursday the findings of an inquest into the 28-year-old boxer’s death were released, and the Coroner was scathing in her condemnation of boxing officialdom.
Reporter: Ross Coulthart
Producer: Garry McNab


#340

Another [alleged] start time for 60 Minutes.


#341

Sunday 2 July at 9.30 pm

PATIENT 71
Five years ago Julie Randall was told she was going to die. No ifs, no buts. Doctors not only said she had melanoma, but that the cancer had spread throughout her body. They said it was incurable and she’d be lucky if she survived the next nine months. But instead of despairing, Julie did something incredible. She made a promise to her family that she wouldn’t die. Then she did something even more amazing. Through sheer determination – and with time quickly running out – she forced her way onto an experimental drug trial in the United States. There had only been space for 70, until Julie became patient 71. This, however, was just the beginning of Julie Randall’s inspiring battle for survival.
Reporter: Allison Langdon
Producer: Garry McNab

WORK TILL YOU DROP
While he doesn’t look it or feel it, Charles Wooley is nudging 70. It’s led him to some serious introspection about his existence, and even more sombrely, contemplation of the “R” word. No, he still loves reporting for 60 MINUTES, but shouldn’t he have retired at 65? Shouldn’t his constant companion these days be a fishing rod instead of a typewriter? But as Wooley discovers, retirement is a word most Australians can no longer afford to dream about. The more likely reality, as former federal treasurer Peter Costello – who is now Wooley’s boss at Channel Nine – has been warning us about for more than two decades, is that we’ll have to work until we drop.
Reporter: Charles Wooley
Producer: Jo Townsend

CHICAGO WITHOUT HOPE
Imagine living in a place where every two hours someone is shot, and every 14 hours someone is murdered. It isn’t Iraq or Afghanistan, but one of the biggest and most sophisticated cities in the world: Chicago. On the city’s south side, which is considered the heart of black America, gang rivalry is tearing its people apart. It has become so brutal that both police and the perpetrators agree this urban warfare is out of control. Liz Hayes ventures into what is now dubbed Chiraq to meet the people who are fighting for survival on the frontline.
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producer: Phil Goyen


#342

Sunday 9 July at 8.45 pm

THE UNTHINKABLE
This Sunday marks a desperately sad anniversary for Ralph and Kathy Kelly. It will be five years since their beautiful 18-year-old son Thomas died after being punched in a coward attack. For the Kellys, it’s been five years of turmoil and trauma. After the horror of their son’s death, Ralph and Kathy wanted some good to happen so they campaigned to change drinking laws in Sydney. There was an immediate and dramatic reduction in alcohol-fuelled violence. But not everyone agreed with the new regulations and the family found themselves a target for sustained and cruel abuse. Then last year, their other son, Stuart, Thomas’s little brother, committed suicide. Once again they were forced to make sense of the unthinkable. On 60 MINUTES, Ralph and Kathy Kelly speak publicly about their loss for the first time and tell Allison Langdon how they firmly believe that had Thomas not been killed, Stuart would still be alive. For the Kelly family the ripple effect of “one punch” goes on but their courage is as remarkable as their resolve to continue helping others. And with the help of the National Rugby League, they are doing just that.
Reporter: Allison Langdon
Producer: Nick Greenaway

APOCALYPSE SOON
Here’s some bad news and some good news. First the bad: the Doomsday Clock is currently set at two and a half minutes to midnight, which is the closest the world has been to monumental catastrophe for the last 64 years. We can thank nuclear weapons, climate change, North Korea and Donald Trump for that scary scenario. But the good news is that it’s not too late to protect yourself against the looming threats, and there are plenty of so-called “doomsday preppers” doing just that. They are building extraordinary bunkers and bolt-holes, and filling them up with everything they need to withstand the disintegration of civilisation. But as he glimpses the end of the world, Peter Stefanovic discovers there’s even some more bad news: the cost of survival doesn’t come cheap.
Reporter: Peter Stefanovic
Producer: Grace Tobin

GOAT RUSH
It was only a few years ago that out beyond the back of Bourke goats were considered nothing more than a blight on the landscape, the worst kind of feral pest. But in an inspired reversal of fortune the Billy goat has become King Billy. Soaring prices for goat meat mean clever farmers have been turning a problem into profit, and Australia has become the world’s largest exporter of the product. The delicious irony though is that despite saving their bacon, most farmers can’t stomach the thought of eating goat. They have remained steadfast beef and mutton men. That is until Charles Wooley introduced them to celebrity chef, Luke Mangan.
Reporter: Charles Wooley
Producer: Nick Greenaway

Please note start time :roll_eyes:


#343

Sunday 16 July at 8.45 pm

THE SURVIVOR
Twenty years ago this month the world was transfixed by the frantic search for life at the alpine ski resort of Thredbo. A landslide had obliterated two ski lodges, burying 19 people beneath an enormous deluge of mud, concrete and rock. As hours turned into days, and with temperatures plunging well below freezing, the prospect of finding survivors began to fade. That was until the muffled cries of Stuart Diver were heard from beneath the rubble. With incredible courage, Stuart clung to life as an extraordinary rescue effort got underway. And 65 nerve-wracking hours after the landslide, Thredbo’s sole survivor emerged to the cheers of the world. For Stuart Diver the elation was short-lived. Numbed by the loss of his beloved wife Sally and so many close friends and neighbours, he struggled to rebuild his life. Eventually he found new love and looked to start a family. But once again tragedy struck when his second wife, Rosanna, was diagnosed with cancer. She lost her fight for life, but not before giving birth to a beautiful baby girl. In a breathtaking 60 MINUTES interview, Stuart Diver speaks candidly to Tara Brown about Thredbo and his life of love and loss. We meet those who were pivotal to his survival and the daughter who has become his world. Two decades after the disaster, Stuart’s incredible zest for life is an inspiration to us all.
Reporter: Tara Brown
Producer: Stefanie Sgroi

BOOM TO BUST
It’s no secret that the big banks can be ruthless when they want their money back. But this story reveals a new low in their breathtaking arrogance. For more than 30 years Roy Lavis helped to build Cairns and turn it into the bustling tourist mecca it is today. His construction company also directly and indirectly employed several thousand locals. Roy’s business was so prosperous the Commonwealth Bank threw money at him and encouraged him to expand. In return he always paid them back on time, principal and interest. Everyone was a winner. Until suddenly the bank changed its mind.
Reporter: Ross Coulthart
Producer: Grace Tobin

SEARCH FOR A SON
A thirst for adventure took Australian Owen Rooney on a dream trip halfway around the world. But he never made it back home. After walking out of a Canadian hospital in 2010, Owen, then 24, simply vanished into the night. It soon became clear the circumstances of Owen’s disappearance were as disturbing as they were baffling. In the months after he went missing 60 MINUTES joined Owen’s family in British Columbia as they searched in vain for their son. There were no answers then, and in the years since, his fate has remained a mystery. That is, until now.
Reporter: Peter Stefanovic
Producer: Ali Smith


#344

I don’t see why this would be broadcast this week as it wasn’t until 2 August that Stewart Diver was rescued. Why wouldn’t it air on Sunday 30 July the anniversary of the landslide?


#345

The Australian reports former AFR columnist Bryce Corbett has joined the show as a producer. He will be based in Brisbane where his family live.


#346

Sunday 23 July at 8.45 pm

SINS OF THE FATHER
There’s never been more scrutiny of the world’s major religions, with a series of sex abuse scandals and cover-ups testing the most faithful. But there’s an equally sinister doctrine being openly preached in small suburban churches scattered around Australia. They call themselves the Independent Baptists, a radical, non-aligned movement with no connection to the mainstream Australian Baptist Ministries. Under the extreme teachings of this church, women must submit to their husband’s every whim. Now one very brave victim of this evil doctrine has decided enough is enough. She lived through hell by being married to a so-called Christian pastor who raped her several times a day. She unfortunately discovered that this cruel dogma runs deep, as her own son, also a pastor, has now turned against her.
Reporter: Liam Bartlett
Producer: Steve Jackson

THIN ICE
Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan are two of the most famous ice skaters in the world, known not only for their performances but also for one of the biggest scandals in sporting history. The then darling of the rink, Nancy, was knee-capped as she competed for a place on the 1994 US Olympic team. Tonya Harding was accused of being the mastermind of the attack. She was kicked out of ice skating quicker than she could perform the triple axel jump she helped make famous, but that was not the end of this long-running and very ugly sporting spat.
Reporter: Peter Stefanovic
Producer: Michelle Tapper

RICHO
If you think politics is bitter and twisted today, it’s nothing compared to when Graham Richardson strode the corridors of power. “Richo” was the numbers man back in the heyday of the Hawke and Keating governments, and there was no one tougher than this head-kicking kingmaker. Twenty-three years ago, however, Senator Richardson unexpectedly quit parliament. As it turns out, he did it because he had an even greater foe to beat: chondrosarcoma, a devastating cancer in the pelvis. At first Richo battled admirably in his fight, but last year the disease did the unthinkable and began dictating terms to a man very unaccustomed to losing. What this politician did next was both desperate and drastic.
Reporter: Charles Wooley
Producer: Sandra Odorisio


#347

Sunday 30 July at 8.30 pm

JUSTICE FOR ANTHEA
A few days ago Martin and Ros Bradshaw quietly marked another dark and bleak anniversary in their lives. It has been 23 years since their beautiful daughter Anthea was brutally murdered in Brunei. Inexplicably, after strangling the 26-year-old Adelaide teacher, the killer then savaged Anthea’s lifeless body by repeatedly stabbing her. No one has ever been charged with the murder, but there has been a suspect: Anthea’s husband of three months, Jeff Hall. Now, having fought an incredible two decade-long battle for more information about Anthea’s death, there may be some hope for the Bradshaw family. In a major 60 MINUTES investigation, Liam Bartlett reveals the significant evidence against Hall, and confronts the suspect in Tokyo to ask him what he knew about his wife’s murder.
Reporter: Liam Bartlett
Producers: Stephen Taylor, Steve Jackson

YOUNG AND CRAZY
Before Cassandra Sainsbury earnt the cruel sobriquet “Cocaine Cassie” by being arrested on drug charges in Colombia, another Aussie was making his name in the dangerous South American country. Rusty Young is an adventurer and author attracted to the world’s most troubled, dangerous hotspots. He is best remembered for his gripping best-seller Marching Powder, his tale of how he bribed his way into, and then lived among, the inmates of Bolivia’s notorious San Pedro prison. But after that, when Rusty relocated to nearby Colombia, things got even crazier. He was recruited by the U.S. government to provide arms and training to Colombian SWAT teams in the fight against the narcos, the drug kingpins, and other violent thugs who ruled the streets. If you didn’t know better, you’d think Rusty’s life might be a drug-fuelled fantasy, but as Tara Brown discovered, it’s all very real.
Reporter: Tara Brown
Producer: Steven Burling


#348

Sunday 6 August at 8.30 pm

IN THE LINE OF FIRE
One moment they were three strangers going to work on an ordinary Monday morning in Melbourne’s CBD. Then, in the blink of an eye, Natalie Gullace, Paul de Waard and Brendan Keilar found themselves deliberately walking into the line of gunfire – staring down and trying to stop an armed madman hellbent on murdering his girlfriend. The heroism the trio showed is beyond words, and while it saved Kaera Douglas’s life it came with a terrible cost. Kaera, Paul and Brendan were shot by drug-fuelled bikie Christopher Hudson, and Brendan died from his wounds. For the first time since the shooting the three survivors reunite to pay tribute to Brendan. They tell Tara Brown the trauma of that day will never leave them, and that a fate as cruel as this should be a reminder to everyone that there’s nothing more precious than life itself.
Reporter: Tara Brown
Producer: Laura Sparkes

TALL POPPY
Remember Poppy King? Twenty-five years ago the then-teenage cosmetics entrepreneur from Melbourne could do no wrong. From nothing, Poppy created a multimillion-dollar lipstick empire and was even named Young Australian of the Year. But when the business hit hard times and collapsed, the lipstick queen’s reputation, once so admired, was smudged almost beyond repair. Red-faced Poppy King left Australia, believing she would never come back. She moved to New York where she picked herself up and dusted herself off. It has taken years of hard work, but as Liz Hayes discovers, a 45-year-old Poppy is now back in business and absolutely thriving.
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producer: Phil Goyen


#349

Sunday 13 August at 8.30 pm

IUNDER THE INFLUENCE
If you think Facebook and Instagram are only about keeping in touch with family and friends, or being wooed and wowed by cute animal pictures, then it’s time to think again. The two giants of social media are vehicles to potentially make bucketloads of money, and an increasing number of clever Australians are cashing in on the billions on offer. As Peter Stefanovic discovers, it all has to do with accumulating followers. The more you have, the greater the influence you wield, and the more attractive you become to businesses willing to pay you huge dollars to promote their products. It’s not quite making money for nothing, but pretty close.
Reporter: Peter Stefanovic
Producer: Stefanie Sgroi

RIGHT OR WRONG
Are we becoming too clever for our own good? Medical science has developed a simple blood test which can tell prospective mothers early in their pregnancies if their babies will have Down Syndrome. The test is 99 per cent accurate and doctors are lobbying to make it free for all Australian women who want to take it. However, nine out of ten mums who receive a positive result are already choosing to terminate their pregnancies. It’s a statistic that horrifies many because, if it continues, it may eliminate a beautiful and special part of our community.
Reporter: Liam Bartlett
Producers: Howard Sacre, Alice Dalley

STEVIE & CHRISSIE
In rock ‘n’ roll it would be difficult to find two more successful or enduring women than Stevie Nicks and Chrissie Hynde. It’d be even harder to find two more different rock legends. For the uninitiated, Stevie rose to fame as the mystical frontwoman of the supergroup Fleetwood Mac, while Chrissie was the feisty lead singer of The Pretenders. Now, to the surprise of many, including themselves, they have teamed up and hit the road. In a very short time, Stevie and Chrissie have not only proven that opposites really do attract, but as they told Liz Hayes, they’ve also shown the world how wonderful it is to be 60-something-year-old-women making a lot of noise.
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producer: Phil Goyen

QUESTION TIME
Unlike his many colleagues at Channel Nine, and millions of television viewers in lounge rooms around the country, there were probably quite a few MPs who breathed a sigh of relief when Laurie Oakes announced his retirement. After all, for politicians, the mere thought of being the subject of an Oakes story on the nightly news was enough to raise a cold sweat. For more than half a century Laurie has reported – without fear or favour – the biggest scoops in Federal Parliament. Along the way he became the finest political journalist this country has produced. Before he retires his famous clipboard for good, longtime friend Charles Wooley thought he’d find out if Laurie can answer questions as well as he can ask them.
Reporter: Charles Wooley
Producer: Ali Smith


#350

Sunday 20 August at 8.30 pm

LOCKED AND LOADED
Dangerous times are set to become even more volatile when war games involving tens of thousands of US, South Korean, and a handful of Australian troops begin on the Korean peninsula next week. One thing is certain: North Korea’s Kim Jong-un won’t be happy about this show of military muscle near his border. Kim is a despot who uses unpredictability and impulsiveness as additional weapons to his growing arsenal of nuclear-capable missiles, so his next step is considered cause for deep concern. Of course the man staring down the rogue leader is not shy either when it comes to belligerence. President Donald Trump has warned Pyongyang that the United States is “locked and loaded”, ready to unleash “fire and fury” if it or its allies is attacked. On 60 MINUTES, Liz Hayes gets unprecedented access to the American military’s nuclear facilities to find out if President Trump’s rhetoric is matched by firepower.
Reporter: Liz Hayes
Producer: Phil Goyen

ON TRIAL
It’s hard not to be angry and disgusted when you hear what Tegan Wagner has endured. When she was 14 she was attacked at a party and gang raped. It was a horrible, humiliating assault and she quite rightly wanted justice. Tegan demanded the perpetrators of the crime be held accountable, and put her faith in our legal system. But she says what was to come was as bad as the rapes. The teenager felt attacked all over again – by defence lawyers whose brutal cross-examination of her in court lasted three harrowing days. What the barristers didn’t count on, however, was Tegan Wagner’s unshakeable courage.
Reporter: Tara Brown
Producers: Stefanie Sgroi, Sean Power

ALLERGIC TO LIFE
One-in-three people will suffer some kind of allergy at some stage in their lives. For most it means a runny nose, a rash, or sensitivity to certain foods. But not for 30-year-old Johanna Watkins. The bizarre and terrifying reality she faces is being allergic to life itself. She suffers from a rare illness that means almost any contact with anything or anyone triggers life-threatening anaphylactic reactions. Off limits for Johanna are most foods, smells, sunlight, friends, her parents … and even her husband.
Reporter: Peter Stefanovic
Producers: Garry McNab, Grace Tobin

THE LONG WAY HOME
Joel De Carteret is probably the unluckiest person in the world. Yet he’s also probably the luckiest. When he was five he got hopelessly lost from his mother in a bustling city market in the Philippines. Try as he might he couldn’t find her, and he was taken to a local orphanage. Eventually he was adopted by a caring Australian family. For the next 30 years Joel was an Aussie, but he always longed to find his birth mother. Late last year he started looking, and guess what? Joel defied odds of one hundred million to one and found her. Now Allison Langdon reveals another remarkable chapter in this extraordinary story.
Reporter: Allison Langdon
Producer: Garry McNab


#351

hasnt the long way home story been on before? or even on another network?


#352

60 minutes did a story about an Indian boy who got lost and couldn’t find his family, got adopted by an Australian family then reunited with his mother about 30 years later. The movie Lion is based on the story.


#353

From memory, this story did not air this week due to the coverage on the Barcelona terror attacks